In 2019, I’ll complete two distinct projects that share similar “worlding,” as both explore women’s experiences in the late 1800s and early 1900s. The first project is my dissertation: Self-Expression and Health: Mind-Body Medicine in the Era of the New Woman (see below for a sneak peak). This work is the result of eight years of research at over 50 archives across the United States and India.

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The second project builds upon many years of research I completed for the National Park Service on the Cone and Lindau families. I am the co-curator of Modern Visions, Modern Art: The Cone Sisters in North Carolina, an exhibition at the Blowing Rock Art & History Museum that features a selection of modern art collected by Dr. Claribel and Etta Cone.


A New History of Mind-Body Medicine

 
Frances Pogle demonstrating “Sauciness”—one the mind-body practices from her book:  The Standard American Speaker and Entertainer , 1901

Frances Pogle demonstrating “Sauciness”—one the mind-body practices from her book: The Standard American Speaker and Entertainer, 1901

 

My dissertation, Self-Expression and Health: Mind-Body Medicine in the Era of the New Woman, tells a history of women who alleviated nervousness through relaxation, breathing, and expressive exercises. “Sauciness” (as shown above) just happens to be one of my favorite practices in their repertoire. If you try it on for yourself, you might agree that striking such a pose generates an effective dose of joy. See below for more examples of the mind-body exercises made popular by a generation of New Women.


Exercises from Physical Culture of the The Emerson College of Oratory, 1891

“This system of physical culture develops the relationship of mind to body, and is, therefore, psycho-physical culture.”