I’m still building the sentences and placing the props, but it’s almost time to pull up the curtain!

In 2019, I’ll complete two distinct projects that share similar “worlding,” as both explore women’s experiences in the late 1800s and early 1900s. The first project is my dissertation: Self-Expression and Health: Mind-Body Medicine in the Era of the New Woman (see below for a sneak peak). This one has been a long-time in the making, and the questions I’ve pursued have taken me to over 50 archives across the United States and India. I’ve loved every minute of the whole winding journey, one that has had its share of dead-ends and vistas alike.

The second project builds on the many years of research I have done for the National Park Service on the Cone and Lindau families. I am co-curating an exhibit for the Blowing Rock Art and History Museum that features pieces of modern art collected by Moses Cone’s marvelously fascinating sisters, Dr. Claribel and Etta Cone.

I’ll add more details about both projects in the near future, so stay tuned!

-Carrie


. . . I sometimes refer to my dissertation as the story of the suffragette’s savasana—which it is—and much more too. . .

Unnamed woman who purchased photographs of herself from Hugh Mangum, a traveling photographer who worked in North Carolina and Virginia in the early 1900s.  Hugh Mangum/Courtesy of Hugh Mangum Photographs, David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library, Duke University

Unnamed woman who purchased photographs of herself from Hugh Mangum, a traveling photographer who worked in North Carolina and Virginia in the early 1900s. Hugh Mangum/Courtesy of Hugh Mangum Photographs, David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library, Duke University

Frances Pogle demonstrating “Sauciness”—one the mind-body practices from her book:  The Standard American Speaker and Entertainer , 1901

Frances Pogle demonstrating “Sauciness”—one the mind-body practices from her book: The Standard American Speaker and Entertainer, 1901

Unnamed woman who purchased photographs of herself from Hugh Mangum, a traveling photographer who worked in North Carolina and Virginia in the early 1900s.  Hugh Mangum/Courtesy of Hugh Mangum Photographs, David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library, Duke University

Unnamed woman who purchased photographs of herself from Hugh Mangum, a traveling photographer who worked in North Carolina and Virginia in the early 1900s. Hugh Mangum/Courtesy of Hugh Mangum Photographs, David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library, Duke University

a new history of mind-body medicine

My dissertation, Self-Expression and Health: Mind-Body Medicine in the Era of the New Woman, tells a history of women who alleviated nervousness through relaxation, breathing, and expressive exercises. “Sauciness” (as shown above) just happens to be one of my favorite practices in their repertoire. If you try it on for yourself, you might agree that striking such a pose generates an effective dose of joy.